Coffee

Our journey round Europe has been an interesting coffee experience.
Both of us like black coffee, no sugar. But ‘black coffee’ comes in many strains, from an intense Italian espresso to the soup bowls of ‘americano’ you get in Britain.
Our coffee of choice is a cup with ‘diluted’ espresso, preferably letting the water run through the grinds for a bit longer than an espresso or at worst adding a little hot water to the espresso.

Caffè Americano.
In Italy, outside of touristy areas you can get away with asking for Caffè Americano and get a decent coffee. In tourist areas they can assume you want a coffee like the Americans want and serve it large with a lot of water .. or dishwater as the Italians refer to it! Says it all really. In these situations you have to enter into discussions along the lines of  a plumber telling you it’s a tricky job, make a face, suck air through your teeth, say stuff like Americano but with poco acqua calda (bad Italian for little hot water) and hope for the best. If it arrives as decent cup, exclaim perfetto, if not make another face, shrug your shoulders and hope for better next time!

Caffè Lungo.
In Italy, if you don’t want to risk the Americano challenge you could try asking for Caffè Lungo which should get you a long coffee made with espresso.

Café Allongé.
This should get you the desired coffee in France. Just be careful that occasionally you could end up with a filter (drip) coffee. You can try Americano but the two dangers in France is the large cup of watery coffee or the French just shrugging their shoulders and looking at you as if you’re mad and have asked them a complicated theoretical physics question!

Café Largo.
This should do the trick in Spain … remembering to roll that ‘r’ !! But occasionally you may have to enter into the Italian game of a little hot water (con poca agua caliente).

Abatanado.
My bad Portuguese pronounces this as Abba-tan-ah-doh but it generally works with getting an ‘extended’ espresso.
Be warned Americano can sometimes get you instant coffee in Portugal!

 

In our travels across a small part of southern Europe it is hard to disagree that Italy has the best coffee and coffee culture. But using a little local knowledge and language can get you decent coffee no matter where you are.

But the morning coffee is not just about the coffee … what do you have with it. Some small, sweet, pastry type thing surely!!
We have raved on previous blogs about Italian cornetto (a sweet croissant filled with jam, cream, chocolate) and cannoli (crispy pastry roll with creamy ricotta filling and flavourings of lemon, chocolate, pistachio). Perfetto!
In France you can have pain au chocolat, raisin etc. but our current favorite is the Portuguese Pastel de Nata, a small custard tart with crispy pastry.
I’m not sure about Spain … they didn’t seem to have a sweet morning coffee accompaniment. The locals in southern Spain seemed to prefer bread and ham. Very nice ham they have too … but missing the point really 🙂

Ignatius

The route – Italy, part three

I have added another route page on the blog covering details of our trip back up through Italy. We returned from Croatia, via ferry to Bari. Travelled north to the Dolomites, into Switzerland for couple of days, back into Italy and finally said goodbye to Italy as we returned to Switzerland. Route got a bit messy in northern Italy (Fionn joined us for a week, visted Kath’s aunt etc.) but we’re not doing the trip to leave a neat breadcrumb trail on the map 🙂

You will need to visit the blog to read the detail if you’re interested. For non-bloggers, click here and then on the Route page in the top right hand corner. Then click on underlined links (Italy, part three) for the detail.

Ignatius

A brief visit to Switzerland

When I wrote the last Diary blog we had booked in to get new tyres and were spending what we thought would be a quiet afternoon catching up and relaxing, at the Stezzano camperstop. Sadly there was a party in the afternoon and early evening in the park behind us, and boy were those people noisy when they were returning to their cars – spending hours chatting at the tops of their voices!

Anyway at last they all left and we had a peaceful if hot night.

24th July

There was not much to do until the appointment at the garage at 4pm, so we were resigned to most of the day waiting around. In the morning it rained heavily – I mean REALLY heavily so we just stayed in the van. When it eased off we drove to the little coffee shop (didn’t want to walk in case it poured again!). Forgot to buy bread so I went out later to buy some, and fell victim to the crazy Italian opening hours. Every shop was closed.

Finally it was time to go to the garage. We played cards while they fitted the new tyres. They were done by around 6pm and we then drove off towards Lake Maggiore, via the motorways. Reached a camperstop at Mergozzo (tiny town at the end of a tiny lake just off Maggiore) around 8pm, and went for a meal at a pleasant lakeside restaurant. That rain had left the air fresh and cool.

However we were not destined for a good night’s sleep – quite a lot of traffic noise, a rooster, and worse – a smell of gas fumes in the van that has been there since the van was left at the airport and was getting worse. Before you worry too much we do have a carbon monoxide detector in the van. But I spent a sleepless night worrying about it and thinking that just as one problem was solved another one rears its ugly head…

25th July

We spent some time this morning investigating those gas fumes. Eventually after some online research and sniff testing around the van, we realised it came from the fridge flue. The fridge has been running on gas except when we are driving a lot lately as we have not been on campsites to use electric. At the back there’s a flue running up behind the fridge and venting outside via a grill. Above the fridge is a cupboard and the fumes smelt strongest there, so we figured that a seal is broken somewhere letting the fumes in via that cupboard.

There is only one answer to problems like this – duck tape. We taped up all joins between that outside vent and the inside cupboard. It seemed to help.

Drove north, into Switzerland, taking our time through gorgeous Alpine passes. We reached Saas Fee, in the next valley along from Zermatt. Here there is a camperstop – well, a car park where you are allowed to stay overnight. There is some confusion about whether free-camping is allowed in Switzerland at all. It was the most complicated system ever – had to go to tourist information office to get day passes, then to the car park office to get a key so we could open the box and plug in our electric cable (wanted a fume free night!) Both offices were a five minute walk in opposite directions to the car park. Finally we got ourselves settled. It was cold up here at 1800m – Google was telling me 2 degrees but I don’t believe it. Definitely under 10 outside though. Shame I’d left my fleece in Bergamo airport arrivals.

At some point on the drive up here a cupboard had swung open and broke off its hinges. So that was yet another running repair needed – this time Ignatius fixed it using a cook’s match and some superglue to fill the holes and allow the hinges to be reattached. Sigh. One thing after another!

26th July

We made good use of our day passes today – they covered all the cable cars and gondolas in the valley. Went up one to a glacier and had a walk around, at about 3000m. It was a bit cloudy – we were under the cloud but could not see the summits.

Kath walking

saas fee1
Lunch stop 2

Then we went back down to the village and up another gondola to 2300m, and walked to a peak at 2700m (approx). Lovely walk, loads of Alpine flowers, and the weather improved as the day went on. Very enjoyable. However at 25 CHF a night we did not want to stay another night, so we left around 5.30 and headed to the Zermatt valley.

saas fee2
Summit view

Here’s where things went wrong. We knew you cannot drive private vehicles to Zermatt and have to park at Tasch and take a train or taxi. But we’d assumed we’d be able to park overnight at Tasch. You can – but you may not sleep in your vehicle overnight. We checked out the two small campsites in the area – both were very full and very expensive. We aren’t prepared to pay 43 CHF when we don’t actually want to use any of the campsite facilities – just need somewhere to park overnight. Eventually after checking out all the limited options we concluded campervans simply aren’t welcome in the Zermatt valley. We headed back out, looking for laybys that did not have a ‘no camping’ sign. Found one a long way back, and stayed there for the night, feeling very cross.

Before switching the fridge to gas, we had another go at duck-taping up all the seals. This time it worked and we had no gas fume smells overnight – hurray. We will obviously have to get this properly sealed and a full gas service done, but hopefully this fix will last until we’re back home.

And we re-planned. Switzerland, although beautiful, is not particularly campervan-friendly. France, on the other hand, is. We found ourselves longing for the French aires, free-camping laybys, cheap campsites. I had wanted to see the Matterhorn hence our attempts to get to Zermatt, but on checking the weather forecast I realised we would not see it tomorrow anyway -the cloud would be too low.

27th July

So this morning we cut our losses and set off, along the Rhone valley to Martigny then over the pass into France, down to Argentiere near Chamonix. There’s a campsite here we stayed at and loved in 2013, along with the boys, in a large tent. Thankfully they had space for us, and so here we are for a few days. The washing’s drying around me as I type, there are loads of walks we can do, the campsite costs about 20 euro a night and is lovely, and we have free travel on local buses and trains in the valley.

argentiere
Settled at Camping Glacier d’Argentiere. That snowy mountain in the background is part of Mont Blanc

We’ve had a few good days in Switzerland – the little trip to Davos and then Saas Fee. We’ll come back some other time and do more of it.

 

Bye, bye – Italy

We have left Italy and are not planning to return this trip. The previous three times we left Italy we planned to return. We had 16 days in Croatia and Bosnia Herzegovina, 2 days in Switzerland visiting  Kath’s aunt and 4 days in Sheffield for Fionn’s graduation. It was always nice to get back to Italy.
We have spent a little over 11 weeks, covered almost 7,000 kilometres and had a whale of a time. Love the country, love the Italians, love the coffee. Less keen on the state of the roads, the litter and the weird opening hours!
Highlights include Bolzano (South Tyrol* in general), the Great Dolomite Road, Tuscan hilltop towns (especially Certaldo), Pompeii, lots of Sicily (watching Giro on Mont Etna), Cinque Terre … and did I mention the coffee, the ice cream, the little cake things (cornetti, cannoli). I must stop now or we’ll turn round and go back. But we’re in Switzerland and the mountains (and France) await.

Ciao
Ignatius

* or as it’s locally known in Italian, Alto Adige or German, Südtirol

A blog of our route back up through Italy will follow soon.

Four days in England

At the end of the last post we were camped for the night by Lake Como. After writing the blog we went for a gorgeous cool swim in the lake – much needed to cool us down, after returning to the heat from those lovely mountain areas.

18th July

The tyre looked ok in the morning… so we drove cautiously to Bergamo, to the camperstop we’d stayed on Fionn’s first night and parked there for a few hours. Fionn and I went for a walk in the local area. Then drove to our airport parking (we had luckily found airport long stay parking that would take campervans), parked, transferred to the airport, hung around for hours as you do, playing cards etc.

Finally reached Manchester, picked up hire car which I am driving so that Ignatius keeps his left-hand drive, Gertie head on, and drove across the Peak District to Sheffield. Fionn is temporarily sharing a flat with an old course mate so we stayed there, after calling at a supermarket for essential breakfast items – bacon! sausages! – that aren’t available in Italy.

Funny to be back in England though not at home.

19th July

A day of running errands. We had a number of things on our ‘UK shopping list’ to buy, and Fionn needed to do a few things as well, so basically we drove round Sheffield doing all that was needed. Bought some new sandals as mine are falling apart. Had lunch with old friend Simon. In the evening I picked up our other son Connor from the bus station – he’d come up from Leicester. We went out for a tapas meal. Apart from one day in March it’s the first time since Christmas the four of us have been together. family

20th July

Graduation day! Spent the morning scrubbing up – thankfully I had brought a decent dress with me so did not have to show up in jeans and a t-shirt. But it’s fair to say we were not the smartest family at the ceremony. It was the usual procession of graduands marching up on stage, shaking hands with the vice-Chancellor as their names were read out. degree

An honorary degree was awarded to astronaut Helen Sharman who was the first Briton in space back in the 1990s when she went up to the Russian space station Mir, that our cat is named after. She gave a good speech. From a chocolate taster at Mars to the stars. One cool woman.

Outside after for photos with our new graduate. I may have shed a tear or two. Very proud mama.grad3grad2

In the evening we went out to eat at a Thai restaurant Simon had recommended. Very good place.

21st July

In the morning we spent some time online, planning when Connor can come to join us. In the end we picked a week near the end of September, near the end of our trip. We’ll be in northern Spain then. By the time we’d finished we had the flights booked and paid for.

Then it was time for more shopping – a Spanish guidebook needed! And Ignatius wanted some novels and sudoku puzzle books. Spent the afternoon walking through various parks in the centre of the city. Dropped Connor off at the bus station in the early evening – he’s off to our home in Bournemouth for a couple of weeks. Fionn went out with his mates so we went out with ours – Simon – to a very nice restaurant and then a pub in the old industrial quarter of Sheffield, now being ‘gentrified’.

22nd July

Lazy morning, had a stroll around Fionn’s local area and lunch in the nearby “Gertie’s Cafe” – well we couldn’t pass that by, could we? Turned out to be a very good spot. And then it was time to say goodbye and head back to Manchester airport. Fionn has a busy couple of weeks ahead – he has a job in Liverpool starting on 7th August and needs to get some accommodation sorted and his stuff moved by then if possible. It’s been so good to spend time with both sons, and nearly two weeks with Fionn.

We drove the Snake Pass road to the airport, did the usual hanging around and eventually arrived back at Bergamo around 10pm. The tyre was still inflated, thankfully. Drove out to the same camperstop we’d used on the day Fionn arrived to spend the night.

23rd July

Neither of us feel very comfortable about that tyre – the screw that went into it was huge and the repair seemed a bit temporary – just some gunk squirted into it. So we decided to at least get it checked before going any further.

After walking up to Stezzano centre for a coffee we headed off to stock up on food and then call at a tyre place I’d found online which was open Sundays. At the tyre shop they offered to properly repair the tyre but said all the tyres looked a bit worn. We had originally intended replacing all four before this trip, but when the van was serviced back in the UK we were told the tyres were good for another 10,000 miles or more so we left them. Anyway, now, after two punctures and with that dodgy repair we agreed it was time to replace the lot. They’ve ordered the tyres which will arrive tomorrow, and we go tomorrow afternoon to get them fitted. So – another night at the Stezzano camperstop and a quiet day tomorrow until it’s time to go back to the shop. I can get some editing done – just as well as I have a deadline looming!graduate