Sicily is one interesting place to take a Motorhome.

The general Sicilian driving behaviour is less ‘structured’ than the UK. Parking often resembles ‘vehicle abandonment’. The surfaces leave ‘a little to be desired’ on the majority of roads and expansion joints, of which there are many, seem to be more of a challenge than I remember in many other countries. But it is interesting and beautiful topography to have to build roads through. A lot of tunnels (with lighting that won’t overly trouble the Global Warming situation!), bridges and raised roadways.

If you’re not a very confident and assertive driver (or cyclist for that matter) then some of the villages and towns will be a challenge, especially Palermo which is just mad, but in a very endearing way.

Having said all that Sicily is a much less frustrating place to drive around than many parts of Britain, just a lot more chaotic.

 

The weather is pleasantly warm and sunny at this time of year (Apr/May) although we did have Saharan dust come visit for a day or so. The overnight rain left a much bigger mess than the occasional dump we get in the south of England.

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Saharan dust cloud over Castellammare

 

Sicilian food is generally an interesting mix of mainly fish and vegetables. Being Italian there is plenty of pizza and pasta. Kath is addicted to caponata, a classic Aubergine sweet and sour vegetable which is extremely moreish. Street food is a great way of experiencing Sicilian cuisine. We stumbled upon ‘the Spice Man’ in the Palermo street markets. Apparently, he featured in The Times and was on Rick Stein’s programme about Palermo. We had a very agreeable lunch time experience at his establishment … a few plastic tables and chairs in the middle of a very busy food market.

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Street food lunch – the post eating photo                                                                                                     … by way of contrast to the pre eating photo usually taken at fine dining restaurants!

 

Architecture, archaeology, monuments, churches and ruins are scattered everywhere you look. Sicily has had a fascinating mixture of cultural influences over the years which has left behind some great structures for us to look and ponder today. How many churches does one small island need?

 

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… bit of natural architecture

 

And then there’s Etna ….

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I’m still a learner at the Sicilian ‘vehicle abandonment’ parking style!

Ignatius